Silver Book Fact

Economic value from flu vaccine in elderly

As over 60% of the economic burden of influenza falls on those ages 65 and older, programs to reduce the impact of influenza on older Americans would have the greatest economic benefit.

Molinari N, Ortega-Sanchez I, Messonnier M, Thompson W, et al. The Annual Impact of Seasonal Influenza in the U.S.: Measuring disease burden and costs. Vaccine. 2007; 25: 5086-96. http://download.thelancet.com/flatcontentassets/H1N1-flu/epidemiology/epidemiology-14.pdf

Reference

Title
The Annual Impact of Seasonal Influenza in the U.S.: Measuring disease burden and costs
Publication
Vaccine
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Molinari N, Ortega-Sanchez I, Messonnier M, Thompson W, et al.
Pages
5086-96
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Economic Value
  • Future Value

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