Silver Book Fact

An estimated 4.1 million Americans currently have diabetic retinopathy. That number is expected to grow to 7.2 million by 2020.

Kempen, John H., Benita J. O'Colmain, M. Cristina Leske, Steven M. Haffner, Ronald Klein, Scott E. Moss, Hugh R. Taylor, and Richard F. Hamman. The Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy Among Adults in the United States. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2004; 122(4): 552-63. http://archopht.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=416212

Reference

Title
The Prevalence of Diabetic Retinopathy Among Adults in the United States
Publication
Archives of Ophthalmology
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Kempen, John H., Benita J. O'Colmain, M. Cristina Leske, Steven M. Haffner, Ronald Klein, Scott E. Moss, Hugh R. Taylor, and Richard F. Hamman
Volume & Issue
Volume 122, Issue 4
Pages
552-63
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Human Burden

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