Silver Book Fact

An estimated 13.9% of Americans age 71 and older have Alzheimer’s disease.

Plassman, Brenda L, Kenneth M. Langa, Gwenith G. Fisher, Steven G. Heeringa, David R. Weir, Mary Beth Ofstedal, J.R. Burke, M.D. Hurd, G.G. Potter, W.L. Rogers, D.C. Steffens, Robert J. Willis, and Robert B. Wallace. Prevalence of Dementia in the United States: The aging, demographics, and memory study. Neuroepidemiology. 2007; 29: 125-32. http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Aktion=ShowAbstract&ArtikelNr=109998&Ausgabe=233821&ProduktNr=224263

Reference

Title
Prevalence of Dementia in the United States: The aging, demographics, and memory study
Publication
Neuroepidemiology
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Plassman, Brenda L, Kenneth M. Langa, Gwenith G. Fisher, Steven G. Heeringa, David R. Weir, Mary Beth Ofstedal, J.R. Burke, M.D. Hurd, G.G. Potter, W.L. Rogers, D.C. Steffens, Robert J. Willis, and Robert B. Wallace
Pages
125-32
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Age - A Major Risk Factor

Related Facts

  • Medicaid expenditures for people who died of dementia were $35,346 in the 5 years before death, compared to $4,552 for those without dementia.  
  • Between 2000 and 2008, deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s disease increased 66%, whereas those attributed to heart disease— the number one cause of death— decreased 13%.  
  • In 2005, the average length of hospice stays for Medicare beneficiaries with Alzheimer’s disease was 99 days.  
  • Between 2005 and 2010, total health care spending for people with dementia was more than $287,000 per person, nearly 60
    Between 2005 and 2010, total health care spending for people with dementia was more than $287,000 per person, nearly 60% percent greater than costs associated with death from other diseases, such as cancer…  
  • Every 69 seconds, someone in the U.S. develops Alzheimer’s disease.