Silver Book Fact

An estimated 1.75 million Americans currently have age-related macular degeneration (AMD). That number is expected to grow to 2.95 million by 2020. * Note that an additional 7.3 million currently at substantial risk for AMD are not included in these projections.

Friedman, David S., Benita J. O'Colmain, Beatriz Munoz, Sandra C. Tomany, Catherine A. McCarty, Paulus T.V.M. de John, Barbara Nemesure, Paul Mitchell, John Kempen, and Nathan G. Congdon. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the United States. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2004; 122(4): 564-72. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed&uid=15078675&cmd=showdetailview&indexed=google

Reference

Title
Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the United States
Publication
Archives of Ophthalmology
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Friedman, David S., Benita J. O'Colmain, Beatriz Munoz, Sandra C. Tomany, Catherine A. McCarty, Paulus T.V.M. de John, Barbara Nemesure, Paul Mitchell, John Kempen, and Nathan G. Congdon
Volume & Issue
Volume 122, Issue 4
Pages
564-72
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Human Burden

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