Silver Book Fact

Across the country, many states and regions are expected to see double-digit percentage increases in the number of people with Alzheimer’s disease–some over 100%–between 2000 and 2025.

Hebert, Liesi E., Paul A. Scherr, Julia L. Bienias, David A. Bennett, and Denis A. Evans. State-Specific Projections Through 2025 of Alzheimer Disease Prevalence. Neurology. 2004; 62(9): 1645. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15136705

Reference

Title
State-Specific Projections Through 2025 of Alzheimer Disease Prevalence
Publication
Neurology
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Hebert, Liesi E., Paul A. Scherr, Julia L. Bienias, David A. Bennett, and Denis A. Evans
Volume & Issue
Volume 62, Issue 9
Pages
1645
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Human Burden

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