Silver Book Fact

About 2/3 of reduced mortality from cardiovascular disease is a result of medical interventions.

Cutler D. Are the Benefits of Medicine Worth What We Pay for It? 15th Annual Herbert Lourie Memorial Lecture on Health Policy. Center for Policy Research Briefs. 2004; 27. http://ideas.repec.org/p/max/cprpbr/27.html

Reference

Title
Are the Benefits of Medicine Worth What We Pay for It? 15th Annual Herbert Lourie Memorial Lecture on Health Policy
Publication
Center for Policy Research Briefs
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Cutler D
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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