Silver Book Fact

A study of Medicare beneficiaries with glaucoma showed that health care costs increased with degree of vision loss–ranging from $8,157 per year for no vision loss to $18,670 for blindness.

Bramely T, Peeples P, Walt J, Juhasz M, et al. Impact of Vision Loss on Costs and Outcomes in Medicare Beneficiaries with Glaucoma. Arch Ophthalmol. 2008; 126(6): 846-56. http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/126/6/849.pdf

Reference

Title
Impact of Vision Loss on Costs and Outcomes in Medicare Beneficiaries with Glaucoma
Publication
Arch Ophthalmol
Publication Date
2008
Authors
Bramely T, Peeples P, Walt J, Juhasz M, et al.
Volume & Issue
Volume 126, Issue 6
Pages
846-56
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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  • A study of Medicare beneficiaries with glaucoma showed that health care costs increased with degree of vision loss–ranging from $8,157 per year for no vision loss to $18,670 for blindness.  
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