Silver Book Fact

A study of Medicare beneficiaries with glaucoma showed that health care costs increased with degree of vision loss–ranging from $8,157 per year for no vision loss to $18,670 for blindness.

Bramely, Thomas, Patti Peeples, John G. Walt, Marta Juhasz, and Jan E. Hansen. Impact of Vision Loss on Costs and Outcomes in Medicare Beneficiaries with Glaucoma. Arch Ophthalmol. 2008; 126(6): 846-56. http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/reprint/126/6/849.pdf

Reference

Title
Impact of Vision Loss on Costs and Outcomes in Medicare Beneficiaries with Glaucoma
Publication
Arch Ophthalmol
Publication Date
2008
Authors
Bramely, Thomas, Patti Peeples, John G. Walt, Marta Juhasz, and Jan E. Hansen
Volume & Issue
Volume 126, Issue 6
Pages
846-56
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

Related Facts

  • Diabetic retinopathy often causes vision loss and blindness during working age years, resulting in more disability and person-years of vision lost than other eye diseases.  
  • In 2001, an estimated 1.4 million age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients visited physicians or hospitals for treatment of their disease.  
  • Between 2015 and 2050, the number of people who are legally blind is projected to increase by 21% each decade.
     
  • An estimated 1 million Americans over the age of 40 are legally blind.  
  • The average annual salary for visually impaired adults is around $10,000 less than individuals with normal vision.