Silver Book Fact

Impact of a healthy lifestyle on age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

A study exploring the impact of a healthy lifestyle on age-related macular degeneration (AMD) found that women whose diets were the healthiest (scored on the 2005 Healthy Eating Index) had 46% lower odds of developing early AMD than those whose diets were the least healthy.  It also found that women with the most physical activity had 54% lower odds for early AMD compared to those with the least amount of physical activity.

Mares J, Voland R, Sondel S, Millen A, et al. Healthy Lifestyles Related to Subsequent Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Arch Ophthalmol. 2011; 129(4): 322-326. http://archopht.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=427181

Reference

Title
Healthy Lifestyles Related to Subsequent Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration
Publication
Arch Ophthalmol
Publication Date
2011
Authors
Mares J, Voland R, Sondel S, Millen A, et al.
Volume & Issue
Volume 129, Issue 4
Pages
322-326
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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