Silver Book Fact

A study exploring the decline in deaths attributable to cardiovascular disease in the U.S. from 1980 to 2000 suggested that approximately 47% of the decrease was due to the increased use of evidence-based medical therapies. 44% was due to changes in the risk factors of the population attributable to lifestyle and environmental changes.

Ford, ES, UA Ajani, JB Croft, JA Critchely, DR Labarthe, TE Kotke, WH Giles, and S Capewell. Explaining the Decrease in US Deaths from Coronary Disease, 1980-2000. N Engl J Med. 2007; 356: 2388-98. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMsa053935

Reference

Title
Explaining the Decrease in US Deaths from Coronary Disease, 1980-2000
Publication
N Engl J Med
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Ford, ES, UA Ajani, JB Croft, JA Critchely, DR Labarthe, TE Kotke, WH Giles, and S Capewell
Pages
2388-98
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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