Silver Book Fact

A recent study showed that memantine, a medicine approved to treat moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s, significantly slows cognitive decline and reduces the need for caregiving by 45.8 hours per month.

Reisberg, Barry, Rachelle Doody, Albrecht Stöffler, Frederick Schmitt, Steven Ferris, and Hans Jörg Möbius. Memantine in Moderate-to-Severe Alzheimer’s Disease. New England Journal of Medicine. 2003; 348(14): 1333-41. http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/348/14/1333?hits=20&where=fulltext&andorexactfulltext=and&searchterm=reisberg&sortspec=Score%2Bdesc%2BPUBDATE_SORTDATE%2Bdesc&excludeflag=TWEEK_element&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&resourcetype=HWCIT

Reference

Title
Memantine in Moderate-to-Severe Alzheimer’s Disease
Publication
New England Journal of Medicine
Publication Date
2003
Authors
Reisberg, Barry, Rachelle Doody, Albrecht Stöffler, Frederick Schmitt, Steven Ferris, and Hans Jörg Möbius
Volume & Issue
Volume 348, Issue 14
Pages
1333-41
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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