Silver Book Fact

A recent study found that more postmenopausal women who took the drug denosumab gained at least 3% of bone mass at the hip and spine than those who took alendronate. The study followed about 1,200 women with low bone mass for over a year.

Direct Comparison of Changes in Bone Density and Bone Turnover Markers in Postmenopausal Women With Low Bone Mass Treated With 6-monthly Denosumab or Weekly Alendronate. http://www.rheumatology.org/press/2008/2008_press_14.asp. Published October 2008

Reference

Title
Direct Comparison of Changes in Bone Density and Bone Turnover Markers in Postmenopausal Women With Low Bone Mass Treated With 6-monthly Denosumab or Weekly Alendronate
Publication Date
Published October 2008
Authors
Deal, Chad, Jacques Brown, Robert Recker, Richard Prince, Douglas Kiel, Jose Ã?lvaro-Gracia, Luiz de Gregorio, Peyman Hadji, Lorenz Hofbauer, Huei Wang, Matthew Austin, Richard Newmark, Cesar Libanati, Rachel Wagman, Javier San Martin, Henry Bone
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Future Value

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