Silver Book Fact

A prior vertebral fracture increases risk of another vertebral fracture by 5-fold for the year following.

Lindsay, Robert, Stuart L. Silverman, Cyrus Cooper, David A. Hanley, Ian Barton, Susan B. Broy, Angelo Licata, Laurent Benhamou, Piet Geusens, Kirsten Flowers, Hilmar Stracke, and Ego Seeman. Risk of New Vertebral Fracture in the Year Following a Fracture. JAMA. 2001; 285(3): 320-3. http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/285/3/320

Reference

Title
Risk of New Vertebral Fracture in the Year Following a Fracture
Publication
JAMA
Publication Date
2001
Authors
Lindsay, Robert, Stuart L. Silverman, Cyrus Cooper, David A. Hanley, Ian Barton, Susan B. Broy, Angelo Licata, Laurent Benhamou, Piet Geusens, Kirsten Flowers, Hilmar Stracke, and Ego Seeman
Volume & Issue
Volume 285, Issue 3
Pages
320-3
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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