Silver Book Fact

Lucentis to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

An FDA-approved ophthalmic drug that treats wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD)–ranibizumab (Lucentis)–maintained vision in 95% of clinical trial participants and improved vision by 15 or more letters in approximately 25% to 34% of trial participants.

Rosenfeld, Philip J., David M. Brown, Jeffrey S. Heier, David S. Boyer, Peter K. Kaiser, Carol Y. Chung, and Robert Y. Kim. Ranibizumab for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration. N Engl J Med. 2006; 355(14): 1419-31. http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/355/14/1419

Reference

Title
Ranibizumab for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration
Publication
N Engl J Med
Publication Date
2006
Authors
Rosenfeld, Philip J., David M. Brown, Jeffrey S. Heier, David S. Boyer, Peter K. Kaiser, Carol Y. Chung, and Robert Y. Kim
Volume & Issue
Volume 355, Issue 14
Pages
1419-31
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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