Silver Book Fact

A biopsychosocial approach (i.e., one that takes into account physical, emotional, and environmental factors in the assessment and treatment of pain) has been found to improve the pain care of patients with a range of conditions including neuropathic and musculoskeletal pain.

Kerns R, Kassirer M, Otis J. Pain in Multiple Sclerosis: A biopsychosocial perspective. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2002; 39(2): 225-32. http://www.rehab.research.va.gov/jour/02/39/2/pdf/kerns.pdf

Reference

Title
Pain in Multiple Sclerosis: A biopsychosocial perspective
Publication
J Rehabil Res Dev
Publication Date
2002
Authors
Kerns R, Kassirer M, Otis J
Volume & Issue
Volume 39, Issue 2
Pages
225-32
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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