Silver Book Fact

A 10 percent reduction in cancer-related deaths in the U.S. would be worth an estimated $4.4 trillion to current and future generations.

Murphy K, Topel R. Measuring the Gains from Medical Research: An economic approach. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press; 2003. https://press.uchicago.edu/ucp/books/book/chicago/M/bo3643529.html

Reference

Title
Measuring the Gains from Medical Research: An economic approach
Publisher
The University of Chicago Press
Publication Date
2003
Authors
Murphy K, Topel R
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Future Value

Related Facts

  • From 1975 to 1996, new cancer drugs increased life expectancy of cancer patients by about one year, at an estimated cost of $3,000—well below the estimated value of a statistical…  
  • Over the next 10 years, the number of cancer survivors in the U.S. is predicted to grow from 14.5 million to nearly 19 million (9.3 million men and 9.6 million…  
  • In 1971, one in 69 people was a cancer survivor (three million survivors). In 2014, that number grew to one in 22 people (14.5 million survivors).  
  • A one percent reduction in cancer-related deaths in the U.S. would be worth an estimated $500 billion to society from increased quality of life and increased productivity from longer lives.  
  • Since 1991 the cancer death rate has fallen by 20 percent.