Silver Book Fact

85-95% of colorectal cancer patients can be cured if the cancer is detected in stage I. If the cancer isn’t detected until a later stage, then the average 5-year survival rate is 50% or less.

Redaelli A, Cranor C, Okano G, Reese R, et al. Screening, Prevention and Socioeconomic Costs Associated with the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer. Pharmacoeconom. 2003; 21(17): 1213-38. https://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00019053-200321170-00001

Reference

Title
Screening, Prevention and Socioeconomic Costs Associated with the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer
Publication
Pharmacoeconom
Publication Date
2003
Authors
Redaelli A, Cranor C, Okano G, Reese R, et al
Volume & Issue
Volume 21, Issue 17
Pages
1213-38
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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