Silver Book Fact

U.S. population over age 65 and over age 85 in 2006

37 million (12% of the population) Americans were age 65 and older in 2006. This population grew from 3 million to 37 million over the 20th century. There were just over 100,000 Americans aged 85 and older in 1900, compared to 5.3 million in 2006.

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics. Older Americans 2008: Key Indicators of Well-Being. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office; 2008. https://agingstats.gov/docs/PastReports/2008/OA2008.pdf

Reference

Title
Older Americans 2008: Key Indicators of Well-Being
Publisher
U.S. Government Printing Office
Publication Date
2008
Authors
Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Today's Older Population

Related Facts

  • Baby boomers in the U.S. (2005)
    As of July 1, 2005, there were about 78.2 million baby boomers in the U.S. Starting in 2006, 330 of them will turn 60 every hour.  
  • Older adults as percentage of U.S. labor force
    In 2014, older adults represented 5% of America’s labor force.  
  • Number of Americans 100+ in 2008
    There were 92,127 Americans age 100 or more in 2008 (0.24% of the total 65 and older population). This is a 147% increase from 1990 (37,306 people).  
  • Average hospital stay for 65+ population, 2007
    The average length of hospital stay for Americans age 65+ in 2007 was 5.6 days–compared to 4.8 days for Americans of all ages.  
  • Older American education levels
    Among the 90-and-older population, about one-third (33.7 percent) stopped after high school graduation. Nearly 28 percent continued their education beyond high school, about half of whom completed a bachelor’s degree…