Silver Book Fact

1/4 of caregivers helping someone age 50 or older, report that the person they are caring for is suffering from Alzheimer’s, dementia, or other mental confusion.

National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP. Caregiving in the U.S.; April 2004. http://www.caregiving.org/data/04finalreport.pdf

Reference

Title
Caregiving in the U.S.
Publication Date
April 2004
Authors
National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

Related Facts

  • The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that there are between 220,000 and 640,000 Americans age 55 to 64 with early onset Alzheimer’s and other dementias.  
  • Between 2000 and 2008, deaths attributed to Alzheimer’s disease increased 66 percent, while those attributed to the number one cause of death, heart disease, decreased 13 percent.  
  • Pneumonia and other infections were the most likely cause of hospitalization for nursing home residents who suffer from dementias, including Alzheimer’s disease.  
  • A study of disease severity in 2003 showed that about 60% of assisted living residents with dementia were in the moderate or severe stages of the disease.  
  • Americans with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias have 3.4 times more hospital stays than the average for someone who does not have dementia.