Silver Book reference

Health, United States, 2005: With chartbook on trends in the health of Americans

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    • In 2003, 28.6% of Americans 75 years and older made 1 – 3 health care visits (visits to doctor’s offices, emergency departments, and home visits); 36% made 4 – 9;…  
    • In 2003, 45.8% of the American population (civilian, noninstitutionalized) made 1 – 3 health care visits (visits to doctor’s offices, emergency departments, or home visits); 24.8% made 4 – 9;…  
    • In 2003, 34% of the population age 65 – 74 years (civilian, noninstitutionalized) made 1 – 3 health care visits (visits to doctor’s offices, emergency departments, and home visits); 35.7%…  
    • Population projections between 2004 and 2024
      Between 2004 and 2014, the 65 and older population is projected to increase by 25.2%. Between 2004 and 2024, it is projected to increase by 70.2%.  
    • Older population by 2050
      By 2050, individuals ages 65-74 are projected to make up 9% of the population. Individuals ages 75 and older are projected to make up 11.6% of the population.  
    • Population projections 2020
      By 2020, the 65 and older population is projected to be over 54 million. The 75 and older population is projected to be close to 23 million.  
    • Among adults 45 and older, between 2002 and 2003 there were over 1/2 a million hospital discharges with at least 1 coronary stent insertion procedure performed.  
    • Use of the Pap smear test is credited with cutting the age-adjusted cervical cancer incidence in half between 1975 and 2001, reducing it from 14.8 to 7.9 cases per 100,000…  
    • Cancer mortality declined more than 2% in 2003, a continuation of the decline that began in 1990.  
    • An estimated 70% of survival improvement in heart attack mortality is attributed to technological advances and procedures developed over the past 30 years, including CABG (coronary artery bypass graft), PTCA…  
    • Total population and older population: United States, 1950-2050
      Total population and older population: United States, 1950-2050  
    • Percent of population in five age groups: United States, 1950, 2004, and 2050
      Percent of population in five age groups: United States, 1950, 2004, and 2050  
    • “The United States spends more on health per capita than any other country, and health spending continues to increase rapidy. Much of this spending is for care that controls or…  
    • In 2000, there were more than 1.3 million home health care patients.  
    • In 2000, there were 105,496 hospice patients.  
    • In 2003, 26.3% of noninstitutionalized Americans between the ages of 65 and 74, and 44% of Americans age 75 and over, had activity limitations caused by chronic conditions.  
    • 12.1% of noninstitutionalized Americans in 2003 had activity limitations caused by chronic conditions.  
    • In 2002, Alzheimer’s disease caused 58,289 deaths in people age 65 and older – 99% of all Alzeimer’s deaths that year.  
    • In 2002, cancer caused 391,001 deaths in people age 65 years and older – ~70% of all cancer deaths that year.  
    • In 2002, Alzheimer’s disease caused 58,866 deaths.  
    • In 2002, diabetes mellitus caused 73,249 deaths.  
    • In 2002, cancer caused 557,271 deaths.  
    • Population projection 55-64 between 2004 and 2024
      Between 2004 and 2014, the population 55-64 years of age is projected to increased by 35.9%. Between 2004 and 2024 it is projected to increase by 42.9%.  
    • Death rates from stroke have decreased from 180.7 per 100,000 persons in 1950, to 56.2 per 100,000 persons in 2002.  
    • Death rates from heart disease have decreased from 586.6 deaths per 100,000 persons in 1950, to 240.8 deaths per 100,000 persons in 2002.  
    • Between 2002 and 2003, heart or other circulatory conditions caused activity limitations for 101.9 of every 1,000 people between the ages of 65 and 74; for 162.6 of every 1,000…  
    • Between 2002 and 2003, diabetes caused activity limitations for 41.1 of every 1,000 people between the ages of 65 and 74; for 49.4 of every 1,000 people between the ages…  
    • In 2003, national health expenditures were 15.3% of the GDP, compared to 5.1% in 1960.  
    • Older population in 2004
      In 2004, those age 65-74 made up 6.3% of the population and those age 75 and older made up 6.1% of the population.  
    • Population projections 2010
      By 2010, the 65 and older population is projected to be over 40 million. The 75 and older population is projected to be close to 19 million.  
    • Older population by 2040
      By 2040, the 65 and older population is projected to be over 80 million. The 75 and older population is projected to be over 44 million.  
    • Older population projections by 2030
      By 2030, the 65 and older population is projected to be over 71 million. The 75 and older population is projected to be over 33 million.  
    • Older population projections by 2050
      By 2050, the 65 and older population is projected to be close to 87 million. The 75 and older population is projected to be close to 49 million.  
    • The percentage of Americans age 55-64 with high cholesterol decreased between 1988-94 and 1999-2002, in part because of the increased awareness about the risks of high cholesterol and the increased…  
    • In 2003, the U.S. spent $1.7 trillion on health, an average of $5,671 per person.  
    • Population projection 65-74 by 2040
      Between 2004 and 2050, the 65-74 population will increase from 6% to 9% of the total and the 75 and older population will increase from 6% to 12%. By the…  
    • Baby boomers in 2029
      By 2029, all of the baby boomers will be age 65 and older.  
    • Growth of 55-64 population in ten years
      The 55-64 population is projected to be the fastest growing segment of the adult population over the next 10 years.  
    • Aging of the U.S. population from 1950 to 2004
      Between 1950 and 2004, the U.S. population got older. During that time, the under 18 population fell from 31% to 25% of the total population; while the 55-64 population grew…  
    • Older population growth between 1950 and 2004
      From 1950 to 2004, the total U.S. resident population grew from 150 million to 294 million–an annual growth rate of 1%. During that same time, the 65 and older population…