Silver Book Fact

Use of pneumonia vaccine in children reduced rates in adults age 65+

Within a year of introduction of PCV7 (7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine) for use in the U.S. in infants, children under 2 years, and high risk children ages 2 to 4; invasive pneumococcal disease rates in unvaccinated individuals age 65 and older fell by 18%.

Whitney C, Farley M, Hadler J, Harrison L, et al. Decline in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease After the Introduction of Protein-Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccine. N Engl J Med. 2003; 348(18): 1737-46. http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa022823

Reference

Title
Decline in Invasive Pneumococcal Disease After the Introduction of Protein-Polysaccharide Conjugate Vaccine
Publication
N Engl J Med
Publication Date
2003
Authors
Whitney C, Farley M, Hadler J, Harrison L, et al
Volume & Issue
Volume 348, Issue 18
Pages
1737-46
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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