Silver Book Fact

When the first of the baby boomers reach age 80 (2031), an estimated 3.5 million people age 85 and older will have Alzheimer’s disease.

Hebert, Liesi E., Paul A. Scherr, Julia L. Bienias, David A. Bennett, and Denis A. Evans. Alzheimer Disease in the U.S. Population: Prevalence estimates using the 2000 census. Archives of Neurology. 2003; 60(8): 1119-22. http://archneur.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/60/8/1119?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=hebert&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&resourcetype=HWCIT

Reference

Title
Alzheimer Disease in the U.S. Population: Prevalence estimates using the 2000 census
Publication
Archives of Neurology
Publication Date
2003
Authors
Hebert, Liesi E., Paul A. Scherr, Julia L. Bienias, David A. Bennett, and Denis A. Evans
Volume & Issue
Volume 60, Issue 8
Pages
1119-22
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Human Burden

Related Facts

  • For families of loved ones with dementia, their out-of-pocket spending in the last 5 years before death was $61,522 compared to $34,068 without dementia.  Informal costs were $83,022 for people…  
  • In 2002, more than 9 out of 10 community-living older individuals with cognitive impairment received daily activity assistance from family, friends or paid workers. Slightly less than 50% of those…  
  • Physician visits were nearly triple for Alzheimer’s disease caregivers when compared to non-caregivers (95.5 per month/100 contrasted to 34.3 per month/100).  
  • While many family caregivers for Alzheimer’s patients get help from other family members, only around 1/2 use any paid help or supportive services. Only 9% use respite services and…  
  • Between 2010 and 2050, the total costs of caring for Americans with Alzheimer’s disease–age 65 and older–will increase 5-fold–from $172 billion to $1.08 trillion each year.  These figures include the…