Silver Book Fact

Using medical imaging to diagnose and treat stroke leads to better outcomes and shorter hospital stays, which yields a net economic benefit of about $8 billion over 10 years.

Johnston, S. Claiborne, John Rootenberg, Sarosh Katrak, W.S. Smith, and Jacob Elkins. Effect of a U.S. National Institute of Health Programme of Clinical Trials in Public Health and Costs. The Lancet. April 22, 2006; 367: 1319-27. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=retrieve&db=pubmed&list_uids=16631910&dopt=AbstractPlus

Reference

Title
Effect of a U.S. National Institute of Health Programme of Clinical Trials in Public Health and Costs
Publication
The Lancet
Publication Date
April 22, 2006
Authors
Johnston, S. Claiborne, John Rootenberg, Sarosh Katrak, W.S. Smith, and Jacob Elkins
Pages
1319-27
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Economic Value

Related Facts

  • Because of the advent of imaging and noninvasive testing, Americans who are asymptomatic are being diagnosed with established cardiovascular disease.  
  • Satisfaction rates of heart valve disease patients with their treatment
     
  • AFib practice guidelines reduce direct health care costs
    The use of practice guidelines in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients significantly decreased hospitalization and resource utilization—with an average decrease in 30-day total direct health care costs of around $1,400 per patient.  
  • The projected economic value of eliminating deaths from heart disease is approximately $48 trillion.  
  • Catheter ablation reduces risk of stroke and death among AFib patients
    Atrial fibrillation patients who underwent catheter ablation had a reduced risk of stroke and death—2.2% of those who had ablation experienced stroke versus 4.7% on medications alone, and 6% died from…