Silver Book Fact

U.S. spending on cancer treatment has risen greatly over time, from $13.1 billion in 1980 to $72.1 billion in 2004. 

Phillipson, Thomas, Michael Eber, Darius N. Lakdawalla, Mitra Corral, Rena Conti, and Dana P. Goldman. An Analysis Of Whether Higher Health Care Spending In The United States Versus Europe Is ‘Worth It’ In The Case of Cancer. Health Affairs. 2012; 31(4): 667-675

Reference

Title
An Analysis Of Whether Higher Health Care Spending In The United States Versus Europe Is ‘Worth It’ In The Case of Cancer
Publication
Health Affairs
Publisher
Project HOPE
Publication Date
2012
Authors
Phillipson, Thomas, Michael Eber, Darius N. Lakdawalla, Mitra Corral, Rena Conti, and Dana P. Goldman
Volume & Issue
Volume 31, Issue 4
Pages
667-675

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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