Silver Book Fact

Total annual medical expenditures are $4,187 higher for men with cancer, and $3,293 higher for women with cancer, compared with individuals without a history of the disease.

Ekwuekme, D, K Yabroff, G Guy, M Banegas, J de Moor, et al. Medical Costs and Productivity Losses of Cancer Survivors: United States, 2008-2011. MMWR. 2014; 63(23): 505-10. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6323a2.htm

Reference

Title
Medical Costs and Productivity Losses of Cancer Survivors: United States, 2008-2011
Publication
MMWR
Publication Date
2014
Authors
Ekwuekme, D, K Yabroff, G Guy, M Banegas, J de Moor, et al.
Volume & Issue
Volume 63, Issue 23
Pages
505-10
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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