Silver Book Fact

The National Institutes of Health estimates overall costs of cancer in 2008 at $228.1 billion–$93.2 billion for direct medical costs (total of all health expenditures); $18.8 billion for indirect morbidity costs (cost of lost productivity due to illness); and $116.1 billion for indirect mortality costs (cost of lost productivity due to premature death).

American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts and Figures 2009. Atlanta, GA: American Cancer Society; May 2009. https://www.cancer.org/research/cancer-facts-statistics/all-cancer-facts-figures/cancer-facts-figures-2009.html

Reference

Title
Cancer Facts and Figures 2009
Publisher
American Cancer Society
Publication Date
May 2009
Authors
American Cancer Society
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Economic Burden

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