Silver Book Fact

The health share of the GDP is projected to increase from 17.6% to 19.8% between 2009 and 2020.

Keehan, Sean P., Andrea M. Sisko, Christopher J. Truffer, John A. Poisal, Gigi A. Cuckler, Andrew J. Madison, Joseph M. Lizonitz, and Sheila D. Smith. National Health Spending Projections Through 2020: Economic Recvoery and Reform Drive Faster Spending Growth. Health Affairs. July 2011; doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2011.0662. http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/early/2011/07/27/hlthaff.2011.0662.abstract

Reference

Title
National Health Spending Projections Through 2020: Economic Recvoery and Reform Drive Faster Spending Growth
Publication
Health Affairs
Publication Date
July 2011
Authors
Keehan, Sean P., Andrea M. Sisko, Christopher J. Truffer, John A. Poisal, Gigi A. Cuckler, Andrew J. Madison, Joseph M. Lizonitz, and Sheila D. Smith
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Economic Burden

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