Silver Book Fact

The estimated annual cost of persistent pain of $560 to $635 billion includes health care costs ($261 to $300 billion) and lost productivity ($299 to $335 billion). However, these estimates are conservative because they do not include the cost of pain for institutionalized individuals, military personnel, children, and personal caregivers. They also do not include the emotional costs of persistent pain or the lost productivity of workers younger than 24 or older than 65.

Darrell G, Richard P. The Economic Costs of Pain in the United States. J Pain. 2012; 13(8): 715-24. http://www.jpain.org/article/S1526-5900(12)00559-7/abstract

Reference

Title
The Economic Costs of Pain in the United States
Publication
J Pain
Publication Date
2012
Authors
Darrell G, Richard P
Volume & Issue
Volume 13, Issue 8
Pages
715-24
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

Related Facts

  • In one study, around half of the patients with persistent pain reported that they had considered suicide.  
  • Persistent back problems reduce financial capacity by reducing wealth accumulation. Over 99% of individuals who are employed full-time have accumulated some wealth at 65 years, whereas only 74% of…  
  • Nearly 1 million Americans develop shingles each year and 10% to 15% of sufferers develop postherpetic neuralgia (PHN)–shingles associated pain that lasts for more than 3 months.  
  • The economic burden of treating persistent pain that develops from acute pain in a 30-year-old over a lifetime is as much as $1 million.  
  • Between 62% and 83% of institutionalized elderly in the U.S. report a pain problem and 17% have substantial daily pain.