Silver Book Fact

The costs of productivity loss because of a chronic disease were 4 times as great as the direct medical costs of a chronic condition.

Loeppke, Ronald, Michael Taitel, Dennis Richling, Thomas Parry, Ronald Kessler, Pam Hymel, and Doris Konicki. Health and Productivity as a Business Strategy. Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine. July 2007; 49(7): 712-21. http://www.joem.org/pt/re/joem/abstract.00043764-200707000-00004.htm;jsessionid=HfgTtZGpspk1sw0MJ1Sb194LW2pzLHJnyCCRkGn9TczKJ5vPlB74!1899110359!181195628!8091!-1

Reference

Title
Health and Productivity as a Business Strategy
Publication
Journal of Occupational & Environmental Medicine
Publication Date
July 2007
Authors
Loeppke, Ronald, Michael Taitel, Dennis Richling, Thomas Parry, Ronald Kessler, Pam Hymel, and Doris Konicki
Volume & Issue
Volume 49, Issue 7
Pages
712-21
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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