Silver Book Fact

The ability to recognize faces declines with age and requires, on average, being 5 feet closer to the face with every decade after the age of 60.

Lott, Lori A., Gunilla Haegerstrom-Portnoy, Marilyn E. Schneck, and John A. Brabyn. Face Recognition in the Elderly. Optometry and Vision Science. 2005; 82(10): 874-81. http://www.optvissci.com/pt/re/ovs/abstract.00006324-200510000-00007.htm;jsessionid=GqnW6wB90JgVG34j51XQ2JLvw9fcB89PJhH3TShgPrfwgqLgs7ps!-1754492629!181195629!8091!-1

Reference

Title
Face Recognition in the Elderly
Publication
Optometry and Vision Science
Publication Date
2005
Authors
Lott, Lori A., Gunilla Haegerstrom-Portnoy, Marilyn E. Schneck, and John A. Brabyn
Volume & Issue
Volume 82, Issue 10
Pages
874-81
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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