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Percent of Medicare Beneficiaries Age 65+ with Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias Who Had Specified Coexisting Medical Conditions (1999)

Bynum, Julie, Peter Rabins, Wendy Weller, Marlene Niefeld, Gerard Anderson, and Albert Wu. The Relationship Between a Dementia Diagnosis, Chronic Illness, Medicare Expenditures, and Hospital Use. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. 2004; 52: 187-194. http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1111/j.1532-5415.2004.52054.x/abs/

Reference

Title
The Relationship Between a Dementia Diagnosis, Chronic Illness, Medicare Expenditures, and Hospital Use
Publication
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Bynum, Julie, Peter Rabins, Wendy Weller, Marlene Niefeld, Gerard Anderson, and Albert Wu
Pages
187-194
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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  • Severe Alzheimer’s disease can cause problems with mobility, eating and breathing. These complications can significantly increase risk for pneumonia–the most commonly identified cause of death in end-stage Alzheimer’s patients.  
  • It costs an average of $4,766 more on healthcare per year for family caregivers who are caring for someone with Alzheimer’s compared to non-caregivers.  
  • The typical first symptom of Alzheimer’s disease is memory loss for recent events.  
  • The typical Alzheimer’s caregiver is a woman, 48 years old, married, employed, without children at home, and with at least some college education.