Silver Book Fact

Over the next 20 years, the non-White population will comprise a growing proportion of the number of fractures, increasing from 282,000 fractures (13% of total fractures) in 2005, to over 637,000 fractures by 2025.

Burge, Russel T, Bess Dawson-Hughes, Alison B King, Daniel H Solomon, Anna Tosteson, and John B Wong. Incidence and Economic Burden of Osteoporosis-Related Fractures in the United States, 2005-2025. J Bone Miner Res. 2007; 22(3): 465-75. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17144789

Reference

Title
Incidence and Economic Burden of Osteoporosis-Related Fractures in the United States, 2005-2025
Publication
J Bone Miner Res
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Burge, Russel T, Bess Dawson-Hughes, Alison B King, Daniel H Solomon, Anna Tosteson, and John B Wong
Volume & Issue
Volume 22, Issue 3
Pages
465-75
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Human Burden

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