Silver Book Fact

Source of 99,000 annual deaths from HAIs

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Of the 99,000 annual deaths from HAIs:

  • 35,967 are from pneumonia
  • 30,665 are from bloodstream infections
  • 13,088 are from urinary tract infections
  • 8,205 are from surgical site infections; and
  • 11,062 are from infections at other sites

Klevens, R. Monina, Jonathan R. Edwards, Chesley L. Richards, Jr., Teresa C. Horan, Robert P. Gaynes, Daniel A. Pollock, and Denise M. Cardo. Estimating Health Care-Associated Infections and Deaths in U.S. Hospitals, 2002. Public Health Reports. 2007; 122(2): 160-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1820440/

Reference

Title
Estimating Health Care-Associated Infections and Deaths in U.S. Hospitals, 2002
Publication
Public Health Reports
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Klevens, R. Monina, Jonathan R. Edwards, Chesley L. Richards, Jr., Teresa C. Horan, Robert P. Gaynes, Daniel A. Pollock, and Denise M. Cardo
Volume & Issue
Volume 122, Issue 2
Pages
160-6
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Human Burden

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