Silver Book Fact

In one study, deep-brain stimulation for Parkinson’s patients significantly reduced their required dosages of antiparkinsonian medications, consequently decreasing their medication costs by 32% 1 year after surgery, and 39% 2 years after.

Charles, P. David, Bimal P. Padaliya, William J. Newman, Chadler E. Gill, Cassondra D. Covington, John F. Yang, Stephanie A. So, Michael G. Tramontana, Peter E. Kondrad, and Thomas L. Davis. Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Reduces Antiparkinsonian Medication Costs. Parkinsonism & Related Disorders. 2004; 10(8): 475-9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15542007&dopt=AbstractPlus

Reference

Title
Deep Brain Stimulation of the Subthalamic Nucleus Reduces Antiparkinsonian Medication Costs
Publication
Parkinsonism & Related Disorders
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Charles, P. David, Bimal P. Padaliya, William J. Newman, Chadler E. Gill, Cassondra D. Covington, John F. Yang, Stephanie A. So, Michael G. Tramontana, Peter E. Kondrad, and Thomas L. Davis
Volume & Issue
Volume 10, Issue 8
Pages
475-9
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Economic Value

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