Silver Book Fact

In 2006, Alzheimer’s disease became the 6th leading cause of death, compared to its ranking of 7th in 2005. Diabetes, ranked 6th in 2005, became the 7th leading cause in 2006.

In 2006, the 15 leading causes of death were as follows:

1. Diseases of heart

2. Malignant neoplasms

3. Cerebrovascular diseases

4. Chronic lower respiratory diseases

5. Accidents (unintentional injuries)

6. Alzheimer’s disease

7. Diabetes mellitus

8. Influenza and pneumonia

9. Nephritis, nephrotic syndrome and nephrosis

10. Septicemia

11. Intentional self-harm (suicide)

12. Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis

13. Essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease

14. Parkinson’s disease

15. Assault (homicide)

Heron, Melonie P., Donna Hoyert, Jiaquan Xu, Chester Scott, Betzaida Tejada-Vera. Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2006. Hyattsville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Center for Health Statistics; June 2008. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/pressroom/08newsreleases/mortality2006.htm

Reference

Title
Deaths: Preliminary Data for 2006
Publisher
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: National Center for Health Statistics
Publication Date
June 2008
Authors
Heron, Melonie P., Donna Hoyert, Jiaquan Xu, Chester Scott, Betzaida Tejada-Vera
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence

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