Silver Book Fact

In 2005, national health expenditures were projected to surpass $2 trillion.

Phillips, Kathryn A., Michael G. Shlipak, Pamela Coxson, Paul A. Heidenreich, Myriam G. Hunink, Paula A. Goldman, Lawrence W. Williams, Milton C. Weinstein, and Lee Goldman. Health and Economic Benefits of Increased Beta-Blocker Use Following Myocardial Infarction. JAMA. 2000; 284(21): 2748-54. http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/284/21/2748

Reference

Title
Health and Economic Benefits of Increased Beta-Blocker Use Following Myocardial Infarction
Publication
JAMA
Publication Date
2000
Authors
Phillips, Kathryn A., Michael G. Shlipak, Pamela Coxson, Paul A. Heidenreich, Myriam G. Hunink, Paula A. Goldman, Lawrence W. Williams, Milton C. Weinstein, and Lee Goldman
Volume & Issue
Volume 284, Issue 21
Pages
2748-54
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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