Silver Book Fact

In 2005, national health expenditures were projected to surpass $2 trillion.

Phillips, Kathryn A., Michael G. Shlipak, Pamela Coxson, Paul A. Heidenreich, Myriam G. Hunink, Paula A. Goldman, Lawrence W. Williams, Milton C. Weinstein, and Lee Goldman. Health and Economic Benefits of Increased Beta-Blocker Use Following Myocardial Infarction. JAMA. 2000; 284(21): 2748-54. http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/284/21/2748

Reference

Title
Health and Economic Benefits of Increased Beta-Blocker Use Following Myocardial Infarction
Publication
JAMA
Publication Date
2000
Authors
Phillips, Kathryn A., Michael G. Shlipak, Pamela Coxson, Paul A. Heidenreich, Myriam G. Hunink, Paula A. Goldman, Lawrence W. Williams, Milton C. Weinstein, and Lee Goldman
Volume & Issue
Volume 284, Issue 21
Pages
2748-54
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

Related Facts

  • In 2004, average annual prescription drug costs for noninstitutionalized Medicare enrollees over 65 was $2,107 per person.  
  • Medicaid spending grew 6.4% in 2007 to $329.4 billion.  
  • Growth in public spending on personal health care, which is projected to be 8% in 2005, is expected to continue to outpace growth in private spending.  
  • Older persons with a spouse and a child, and older persons living with others were most likely to rely entirely on informal care (about 62% for both groups).  
  • Total spending on health care is projected to reach $4.1 trillion by 2016.