Silver Book Fact

In 2005, national health care expenditures in the U.S. totaled $2 trillion–a 6.9% increase from 2004. The rate of increase slowed for the third consecutive year, though it was still higher than the growth in the gross domestic product (GDP).

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Health, United States, 2007: with chartbook on trends in the health of Americans. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; November 2007. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus07.pdf

Reference

Title
Health, United States, 2007: with chartbook on trends in the health of Americans
Publisher
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Publication Date
November 2007
Authors
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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