Silver Book Fact

Full medication coverage is expected to increase patient compliance from 50% to 76%. Expanded coverage would cost insurers an average of $644 more per patient, but would avert an average of $6,770 in event-related costs. Insurers would ultimately save $5,974 per patient.

Choudhry N, Avorn J, Antman EM, Schneeweiss S, Shrank WH. Should Patients Receive Secondary Prevention Medications For Free After A Myocardial Infarction? An economic analysis. Health Affairs. 2007; 26(1): 186-194. https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/abs/10.1377/hlthaff.26.1.186?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed

Reference

Title
Should Patients Receive Secondary Prevention Medications For Free After A Myocardial Infarction? An economic analysis
Publication
Health Affairs
Publisher
Project HOPE
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Choudhry N, Avorn J, Antman EM, Schneeweiss S, Shrank WH
Volume & Issue
Volume 26, Issue 1
Pages
186-194
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Economic Value

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