Silver Book Fact

From 2005 – 2008, around 4.2 million diabetics age 40 and older had diabetic retinopathy.  Of these, 655,000 had advanced diabetic retinopathy that could lead to severe vision loss.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease and Health Promotion. National Diabetes Fact Sheet: National estimates and general information on diabetes and prediabetes in the United States, 2011. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control & Prevention; 2011. http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/pdf/ndfs_2011.pdf

Reference

Title
National Diabetes Fact Sheet: National estimates and general information on diabetes and prediabetes in the United States, 2011
Publisher
Centers for Disease Control & Prevention
Publication Date
2011
Authors
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease and Health Promotion
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence

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