Silver Book Fact

Older population growth between 1950 and 2004

From 1950 to 2004, the total U.S. resident population grew from 150 million to 294 million–an annual growth rate of 1%. During that same time, the 65 and older population grew twice as rapidly–increasing from 12 million to 36 million. The 75 and older population grew close to 3% faster than the total population, increasing from 4 million to 18 million.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Health, United States, 2005: With chartbook on trends in the health of Americans. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2005. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus05.pdf

Reference

Title
Health, United States, 2005: With chartbook on trends in the health of Americans
Publisher
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Publication Date
2005
Authors
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics
URL
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Categories

  • Today's Older Population

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