Silver Book Fact

For beneficiaries with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), annual Medicare part B payments for vision care increased from $1,504 per beneficiary in 1994 to $3,263 in 2006–due in large part to anti-VEGF treatments.

Day, Shelley, Kofi Acquah, Paul P. Lee, Prithvi Mruthyunjaya, and Frank A. Sloan. Medicare Costs for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration, 1994-2007. Ophthalmol. May 2011; 152(6): 1014-20. http://www.ajo.com/article/S0002-9394%2811%2900410-7/abstract

Reference

Title
Medicare Costs for Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration, 1994-2007
Publication
Ophthalmol
Publication Date
May 2011
Authors
Day, Shelley, Kofi Acquah, Paul P. Lee, Prithvi Mruthyunjaya, and Frank A. Sloan
Volume & Issue
Volume 152, Issue 6
Pages
1014-20
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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