Silver Book Fact

Cancer death rates for all races/ethnicities and both sexes combined decreased by 2.1% per year from 2002-2004, nearly twice the annual decrease of 1.1% per year from 1993-2002.

Espey, Daivd K., Xiao-Cheng Wu, Judith Swan, Charles Wiggins, Melissa A. Jim, Elizabeth Ward, Phyllis A. Wingo, Holly L. Howe, Lynn A. G. Ries, Barry A. Miller, Ahmedin Jemal, Faruque Ahmed, Nathaniel Cobb, Judith S. Kaur, and Brenda K. Edwards. Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2004: Featuring cancer in American Indians and Alaska Natives; October 2007. http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/116330621/HTMLSTART

Reference

Title
Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2004: Featuring cancer in American Indians and Alaska Natives
Publication Date
October 2007
Authors
Espey, Daivd K., Xiao-Cheng Wu, Judith Swan, Charles Wiggins, Melissa A. Jim, Elizabeth Ward, Phyllis A. Wingo, Holly L. Howe, Lynn A. G. Ries, Barry A. Miller, Ahmedin Jemal, Faruque Ahmed, Nathaniel Cobb, Judith S. Kaur, and Brenda K. Edwards
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

Related Facts

  • Close to one third of all drugs currently in the biopharmaceutical pipeline are for cancer, with around 5,500 potential first-in-class cancer medicines in development.  
  • A modest decrease of 1% in cancer mortality has been estimated to be worth $500 billion in social value.  
  • Improvements in surgical techniques and combination therapies increased the 1-year survival rate for lung cancer from 34 percent in 1975-1977 to 45 percent in 2006-2009.  
  • If the use of recommended colorectal screening increased to 70.5 percent, 1,000 additional lives could be saved each year.  
  • Increased use of medical technology, like colonoscopy and sigmoidoscopy for colon cancer screening, could save $178.2 billion between 2010 and 2035.