Silver Book Fact

Blindness (compared to no visual impairment) is associated with more than $2,000 in excess annual medical expenses per person.

Frick, Kevin D., Emily W. Gower, John H. Kempen, and Jennifer L. Wolff. Economic Impact of Visual Impairment and Blindness in the United States. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2007; 125(4): 544-50. http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/125/4/544

Reference

Title
Economic Impact of Visual Impairment and Blindness in the United States
Publication
Archives of Ophthalmology
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Frick, Kevin D., Emily W. Gower, John H. Kempen, and Jennifer L. Wolff
Volume & Issue
Volume 125, Issue 4
Pages
544-50
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

Related Facts

  • An estimated 1.75 million Americans age 40 and older have advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Another 7.3 million are at substantial risk for vision loss from AMD.  
  • An estimated 4.1 million Americans currently have diabetic retinopathy. That number is expected to grow to 7.2 million by 2020.  
  • In one study of patients age 48 and older, 17% of the women and 11.1% of the men had dry eye.  
  • Increase in trouble seeing with age, 2006
    16.8% of the non-institutionalized adults 65 years and older have some trouble seeing, even with glasses or contacts. That number increases to 19.9% in adults 75 years and older.  
  • Losing eyesight potential for greatest impact on day-to-day life poll finds
    Poll finds losing eyesight as potentially having greatest impact on day-to-day life–more than other conditions including loss of limb, memory, hearing, and speech (57% of African Americans polled, 49% of non-Hispanic…