Silver Book Fact

Aging of the U.S. population from 1950 to 2004

Between 1950 and 2004, the U.S. population got older. During that time, the under 18 population fell from 31% to 25% of the total population; while the 55-64 population grew from 9% to 10%, the 65-74 population stayed at about 6%, and the 75 and older population grew from 3% to 6% of the total population.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Health, United States, 2005: With chartbook on trends in the health of Americans. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2005. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hus/hus05.pdf

Reference

Title
Health, United States, 2005: With chartbook on trends in the health of Americans
Publisher
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
Publication Date
2005
Authors
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics
URL
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Categories

  • Today's Older Population

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