Silver Book Fact

Aspirin, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and statins, when taken in combination, have been estimated to reduce the relative risk of coronary heart disease mortality by 80%, compared with a placebo.

Choudhry N, Avorn J, Antman EM, Schneeweiss S, Shrank WH. Should Patients Receive Secondary Prevention Medications For Free After A Myocardial Infarction? An economic analysis. Health Affairs. 2007; 26(1): 186-194. https://www.healthaffairs.org/doi/abs/10.1377/hlthaff.26.1.186?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed

Reference

Title
Should Patients Receive Secondary Prevention Medications For Free After A Myocardial Infarction? An economic analysis
Publication
Health Affairs
Publisher
Project HOPE
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Choudhry N, Avorn J, Antman EM, Schneeweiss S, Shrank WH
Volume & Issue
Volume 26, Issue 1
Pages
186-194
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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