Silver Book Fact

As our population continues to age, a doubling of cancer diagnoses is predicted– from 1.3 million in 2000 to 2.6 million in 2050.

Edwards, Brenda K., Holly L. Howe, Lynn A.G. Ries, Michael J. Thun, Harry M. Rosenberg, Rosemary Yancik, Phyllis A. Wingo, Ahmedin Jemal, and Ellen G. Feigal. Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1973-1999: Featuring implications of age and aging on U.S. cancer burden. Cancer. 2002; 94(10): 2766-92. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12173348

Reference

Title
Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1973-1999: Featuring implications of age and aging on U.S. cancer burden
Publication
Cancer
Publication Date
2002
Authors
Edwards, Brenda K., Holly L. Howe, Lynn A.G. Ries, Michael J. Thun, Harry M. Rosenberg, Rosemary Yancik, Phyllis A. Wingo, Ahmedin Jemal, and Ellen G. Feigal
Volume & Issue
Volume 94, Issue 10
Pages
2766-92
URL
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Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Future Human Burden

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