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~1.7 million Americans develop hospital-acquired HAIs annually

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Approximately 1.7 million Americans develop hospital-acquired HAIs each year.

Klevens, R. Monina, Jonathan R. Edwards, Chesley L. Richards, Jr., Teresa C. Horan, Robert P. Gaynes, Daniel A. Pollock, and Denise M. Cardo. Estimating Health Care-Associated Infections and Deaths in U.S. Hospitals, 2002. Public Health Reports. 2007; 122(2): 160-6. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1820440/

Reference

Title
Estimating Health Care-Associated Infections and Deaths in U.S. Hospitals, 2002
Publication
Public Health Reports
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Klevens, R. Monina, Jonathan R. Edwards, Chesley L. Richards, Jr., Teresa C. Horan, Robert P. Gaynes, Daniel A. Pollock, and Denise M. Cardo
Volume & Issue
Volume 122, Issue 2
Pages
160-6
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence

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