Silver Book Fact

An individual who is visually impaired or blind accumulates nearly $1,479 in vision-related expenses each year– not including health utility or QALY losses. At this rate, after 8 years an individual would accumulate $10,000 in excess expenditures.

Frick, Kevin D., Emily W. Gower, John H. Kempen, and Jennifer L. Wolff. Economic Impact of Visual Impairment and Blindness in the United States. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2007; 125(4): 544-50. http://archopht.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/125/4/544

Reference

Title
Economic Impact of Visual Impairment and Blindness in the United States
Publication
Archives of Ophthalmology
Publication Date
2007
Authors
Frick, Kevin D., Emily W. Gower, John H. Kempen, and Jennifer L. Wolff
Volume & Issue
Volume 125, Issue 4
Pages
544-50
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Economic Burden

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