Silver Book Fact

An estimated 6.5% of Americans age 40 and older have age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Klein, Ronald, Chiu-Fang Chou, Barbara E. K. Klein, Xinzhi Zhang, Stacy M. Meuer, and Jinan B. Saadine. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the U.S. Population. Arch Ophthalmol. January 2011; 129(1): 75-80. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&cts=1330977849323&ved=0CDoQFjAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Farchopht.ama-assn.org%2Fcgi%2Fcontent%2Ffull%2F129%2F1%2F75&ei=NhxVT7f9N8W30AHSq6C8DQ&usg=AFQjCNGXJ3281XFLb-OelB4n3njSRegX2g

Reference

Title
Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the U.S. Population
Publication
Arch Ophthalmol
Publication Date
January 2011
Authors
Klein, Ronald, Chiu-Fang Chou, Barbara E. K. Klein, Xinzhi Zhang, Stacy M. Meuer, and Jinan B. Saadine.
Volume & Issue
Volume 129, Issue 1
Pages
75-80
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence

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