Silver Book Fact

An estimated 1.75 million Americans age 40 and older have advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Another 7.3 million are at substantial risk for vision loss from AMD.

Friedman, David S., Benita J. O'Colmain, Beatriz Munoz, Sandra C. Tomany, Catherine A. McCarty, Paulus T.V.M. de John, Barbara Nemesure, Paul Mitchell, John Kempen, and Nathan G. Congdon. Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the United States. Archives of Ophthalmology. 2004; 122(4): 564-72. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=pubmed&uid=15078675&cmd=showdetailview&indexed=google

Reference

Title
Prevalence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in the United States
Publication
Archives of Ophthalmology
Publication Date
2004
Authors
Friedman, David S., Benita J. O'Colmain, Beatriz Munoz, Sandra C. Tomany, Catherine A. McCarty, Paulus T.V.M. de John, Barbara Nemesure, Paul Mitchell, John Kempen, and Nathan G. Congdon
Volume & Issue
Volume 122, Issue 4
Pages
564-72
URL
Read Full Resource

Categories

  • Cost of Disease
  • Prevalence & Incidence

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