Silver Book Fact

A recent study showed that memantine, a medicine approved to treat moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s, significantly slows cognitive decline and reduces the need for caregiving by 45.8 hours per month.

Reisberg B, Doody R, Stoffler A, Schmitt F, et al. Memantine in Moderate-to-Severe Alzheimer’s Disease. New England Journal of Medicine. 2003; 348(14): 1333-41. http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/348/14/1333?hits=20&where=fulltext&andorexactfulltext=and&searchterm=reisberg&sortspec=Score%2Bdesc%2BPUBDATE_SORTDATE%2Bdesc&excludeflag=TWEEK_element&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&resourcetype=HWCIT

Reference

Title
Memantine in Moderate-to-Severe Alzheimer’s Disease
Publication
New England Journal of Medicine
Publication Date
2003
Authors
Reisberg B, Doody R, Stoffler A, Schmitt F, et al
Volume & Issue
Volume 348, Issue 14
Pages
1333-41
URL
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Categories

  • Innovative Medical Research
  • Human Value

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